Chappell: Entrusting rookie QBs can be bumpy ride, but payoff can be great

Good old Mike Chappell of The Indianapolis Star delves into the difficulties and benefits of entrusting the offense to a rookie quarterback

While his completion percentage seems out of character, that's not necessarily the case. In his final two seasons at Stanford, Luck completed 70.7 and 71.3 percent of his passes. But he was a 56.3 passer in his first year as a starter while learning the landscape. Manning ranks No. 5 in NFL history with a 65.0 completion rate. As a rookie, he fired away at a 56.7 clip.

As people are comparing Andrew Luck to Peyton Manning, even when it's intended to set people's minds at ease over his struggles as a rookie.  In this case, it's his accuracy.   

One thing that seems to be almost missing from the Colts offense is the short route.  So many of the routes in Bruce Arians's offense are intermediate and deep routes where the young quarterback is left in the line of fire from porous protection on more slowly developing plays.  Where are the outlet passes, the running backs in the flat, the quick slants, the tight ends over the middle? 

Yes, it's easy for someone like me who isn't a coach to sit back and say these things, but I would like to see Luck have more opportunities to dink and dunk, as they say, gaining confidence, and efficiency for both him and the offensive line.  In the meantime, the coaches have regularly trusted Andrew Luck to make deeper, more difficult throws, and that says something about the young signal caller's physical and mental abilities. 

 

 

@MarcusDugan

Marcus Dugan

About Marcus Dugan

Marcus is a husband, dad, twitter geek, and all around average guy who covers news, game recaps, and additional material for The Colts Authority, while working even harder as an Indy area real estate broker. He's been known to overuse parentheses while editorializing (but who doesn't?)

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