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Pep Hamilton’s Quotes Misreported, Cause Unnecessary Angst

When Pep Hamilton was originally hired back in January, the initial reaction was incredibly positive. With Hamilton’s familiarity with Andrew Luck, and vice versa, there seems to be a base for a successful marriage.

There were a few things that were concerning about Hamilton’s initial hiring, namely the hints and brief mentions of possibly running Andrew Luck in read-option or pistol sets. Hamilton would briefly mention these things  several times in the aftermath of his hiring, causing more than a few eyebrows to raise.

The idea of running your star quarterback into potentially hazardous situations is one that many fans, bloggers, analysts, etc. find questionable, and were cautious about. But, while disliking the idea, most also took his comments to be just that: comments. As I said back in February:

“Until any of this coachspeack turns into actions, it’s not all that concerning.”

Any consternation faded away as the offseason continued, especially after Chuck Pagano’s comments in March.

Then, Monday afternoon, Brad Wells at Stampede Blue wrote up a piece I ran across via Paul Kuharsky’s RTC links. In the piece, Wells reported that Hamilton had brought up the pistol/read-option possibility again during last weekend’s mini-camp, directly contradicting Pagano’s comments in March:

There’s nothing we can’t do. We can incorporate some pistol concepts, which is kind of a trend, an ‘en vogue’ thing in the league right now. Everybody’s talking about the QB option, the QB read game, the QB pistol, the pistol components that we can run. But, we’ll be smart. We’ll be judicious in how much we expose Andrew to taking additional hits.

Wells decried the inconsistencies between the Colts’ staff, and not without reason. While I’m not the biggest fan of Wells’ “style,” the variety of rhetoric coming out of the Colts’ camp would be worth noting.

That is of course, if Hamilton had actually said what was reported.

The quotes that Wells refers to come from a video embedded in an article on Colts.com. That article was written  last Saturday, but the video was NOT from mini camp.

The video, part of the Colts’ Up Close Online video series, was originally posted on Colts.com on February 19, nearly three months ago.

So, any consternation about Hamilton and Pagano’s disconnect is completely unnecessary, as it doesn’t exist, at least, not in the way Wells reported it.

Now, let’s say that Hamilton actually had said what Wells claimed. If it was true, the discussion would be a worthy one, although maybe not the concern that Wells and some fans may think is warranted. The fact is that any comments about the Colts’ offense at this point are just that: comments.

Until we see Andrew Luck in harm’s way, don’t expect it to happen. Jim Irsay knows the dangers. Chuck Pagano knows the dangers.

Will the Colts use some pistol, some read-option? Will they utilize Luck’s mobility? Possibly. Personally, I’d love to see more designed roll-outs.

But until it happens, getting all riled up about comments in mini-camp isn’t doing anybody any good. We’ll likely still report on quotes, especially if we think they’re concerning. But they’ll be mild concerns at most.

Words during the offseason are just that: words. Until they turn to action, they’re not worth angst.

Kyle J. Rodriguez

About Kyle J. Rodriguez

A film and numbers guru, Kyle writes about the NFL and the Indianapolis Colts for Bleacher Report, Draft Mecca and The Football Educator, and is a co-founder and associate editor of Colts Authority. Kyle also is a high school sports reporter for the MLive Media Group in Michigan, covering high school sports across the state.

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