Kravitz: Clean house

I’ve been struggling to come to terms with this article as I agree with much of what Bob Kravitz says here.  He says to kick both Polians to the curb, fire Caldwell and get a strong coach who wants more organizational control.  He’s particularly hard on the Polians and to a degree justifiably so:

Bill Polian’s volcanic temper and temperament were acceptable dues Irsay was willing to pay when the Colts were on top. Now, it has become nothing less than embarrassing, whether Polian is demanding vindication for sticking by Painter, or calling people “rats who lie,” or stepping on his team’s first and only victory by addressing a story that should have been addressed with a news release days earlier. His not-at-all-veiled potshots at former defensive coordinator Larry Coyer have been downright distasteful and cheap.

Now we’re told this is Chris Polian’s baby, although the current general manager is quoted as much as J.D. Salinger once was. The record this year hasn’t been kind. The numbers are there. The mistakes are manifold. We don’t really have to lay them all out here, do we? 

OK…I can see his point about Chris Polian.  It smells like nepotism and we haven’t exactly seen anything manifestly different since Chris took over the reigns.

He gives Caldwell a bit of a pass:

As for Caldwell, his future is far shakier than the Polians’, and in a way, that’s a shame. I don’t drop the whole season on him. He lost Manning. He was left with an untested offensive line and a sub-standard secondary, with recent draftees who haven’t produced. Caldwell has been cut off at the knees by the Polians.

Here’s where I strongly disagree.  Caldwell is undoubtedly a fine man of tremendous character and as close to Tony Dungy as you can find these days.  He’s also a horrible game manager. Playing for a FG last night (which Vinny missed) horrified me.  The numerous inconsistencies in his use of the game clock along with poor choices in punting situations are why Caldwell should go.  Peyton Manning doesn’t help you when your coach decides to go with ultra-conservative methods.

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