Fouts on the Colts Offense

Normally, I’d put this in the links section, but since I wrote a whole post about it yesterday, I figured it would go well on page one.  I heard back from Brett from Midway Illustrated.  One of the Bears writers ran down Dan Fouts to talk about the Bears offense, the Colts offense, and the difference between Air Coryell and the Run and Shoot.

As for Moore, his offense is based more closely on run-and-shoot type schemes. Moore won two Super Bowl rings while an assistant for Chuck Noll in Pittsburgh. He later became the offensive coordinator for the Lions, which under his watch led the league in total offense in 1995.

He was an ideal fit for the cerebral Manning and the Colts. Rather than using motion, Moore’s no-huddle attack relies on the quarterback reading the defense and adjusting accordingly prior to the snap. Oftentimes, it’s as simple as Manning using his cadence to make defenses think he’s about to snap the ball when in actuality he’s just trying to make the defense commit so he can adjust and exploit the defensive play-call.

While Martz runs his base plays out of dozens of different formations, the Colts run most of their plays out of the same formation.

“I just marvel at Peyton’s understanding and what he orchestrates at the line of scrimmage,” Fouts said. “Tom just doesn’t get enough credit for the success he’s gotten everywhere he’s gone. It’s a mystery to me why his name isn’t mentioned with the great offensive coordinators of all time.”

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